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MUN 2018 - Port of Spain addresses Human Trafficking

Model United Nations 2018 was hosted by the Rotary Club of Central Port of Spain, Trinidad.  110 students from 50 schools in Barbados, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago participated in six weeks of training activities that led up to the simulation of the General Assembly Plenary on 17 and 18 March 2018 at the Hilton Hotel in Port of Spain Trinidad. The Topic that was addressed was the situation of refugees related to armed conflict. The is year the UN also celebrates the 70th anniversary of the UDHR. The  President of the General Assembly of the MUN rang home the importance of the UDHR and its connection to refugee rights in his message to the Assembly. 

 This year marks the seventieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was born out of and endorsed by the United Nations. It is unanimously accepted and was fashioned to guarantee fundamental human rights for every single person, regardless. 

 During this assembly’s deliberations, I urge you to talk about what comes next, to agree that every human life has to matter, regardless of borders, religious or political standing. Let us come to consensus, let us demonstrate to our people that we the peoples of this United Nations are determined to leave this abhorrent trade in human beings in the past forever!

 

Because of armed confilict in multiple regions across the world, particularly the Middle East and East Africa, there have been increases in the flow of people seeking asylum. The impact of armed conflict on women and girls is particularly grave and includes sexual exploitation and violence. The social and economic challenges of providing assistance to victims of human trafficking and refugees are complex and often the UN is looked on to take the lead in coordinating relief and negoiating the process for an international response. The Rotary Club and its sponsors felt compelled to involve the young people in this global dialogue which raises many questions and issues like racism, xenophobia and gender equality; more importantly there is hope that the dialogue will encourage youth to become more interested in standing up for human rights for peopole everywhere.

#STANDUP4HUMANRIGHTS


 PHOTOS:

MUN T&T delegates 2018 at the Hilton Hotel in Port of Spain

 

MUN2018 portofspain

 


 Delegates peforming at the night of culture - MUN 2018 Trinidad

MUN STUDENTSSINGING

Youth in the Caribbean and Denmark talk about gender based violence

Students from Trinidad, Jamaica and Denmark connected online on Friday 8 December to eneage in dialogue about gender based violence. They exchanges ideas about the causes of violence and explored how culture and legislation or lack of, impacted on attempts to bring an end to violence particularly  violence against women. The event was hosted by the UINIC and the UNESCO ASPnet brought the schools together. Some interesting issues the young people highlighed were how the thought music impacted on how women are seen by males, the problems associated with rigid male ideas of Caribbean masculinity and how it could be a factor in violence against women in the region. The Danes explained that human rights is part of their eduction and culture, that vilolence was not as extreme as it is in the Caribbean , but lamented that their country still does rank at the top in their region when it comes to gender based violence.

This activity was one of a number of events during the 16 Days of Activism which starts on 25 November and culminates on 10 December - Human Rights Day. During this period the UN and its partners highlight the global issues of gender equality and gender based violence.

Get Involved:

There is so much that you can do to ensure that everyone enjoys equal rights with dignity, everywhere. Some things you can do from your mobile phone or in your classroom. 

#Standup4HumanRights 

Promote | Engage | Reflect 

Join the UN in celebrating 70 year of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights:

70 Years UDHR LOGO E 01

Youth in the Caribbean and Denmark talk about gender based violence

Students from Trinidad, Jamaica and Denmark connected online on Friday 8 December to eneage in dialogue about gender based violence. They exchanges ideas about the causes of violence and explored how culture and legislation or lack of, impacted on attempts to bring an end to violence particularly  violence against women. The event was hosted by the UINIC and the UNESCO ASPnet brought the schools together. Some interesting issues the young people highlighed were how the thought music impacted on how women are seen by males, the problems associated with rigid male ideas of Caribbean masculinity and how it could be a factor in violence against women in the region. The Danes explained that human rights is part of their eduction and culture, that vilolence was not as extreme as it is in the Caribbean , but lamented that their country still does rank at the top in their region when it comes to gender based violence.

This activity was one of a number of events during the 16 Days of Activism which starts on 25 November and culminates on 10 December - Human Rights Day. During this period the UN and its partners highlight the global issues of gender equality and gender based violence.

Get Involved:

There is so much that you can do to ensure that everyone enjoys equal rights with dignity, everywhere. Some things you can do from your mobile phone or in your classroom. 

#Standup4HumanRights 

Promote | Engage | Reflect 

Join the UN in celebrating 70 year of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights:

70 Years UDHR LOGO E 01

Youth in the Caribbean and Denmark talk about gender based violence

Students from Trinidad, Jamaica and Denmark connected online on Friday 8 December to eneage in dialogue about gender based violence. They exchanges ideas about the causes of violence and explored how culture and legislation or lack of, impacted on attempts to bring an end to violence particularly  violence against women. The event was hosted by the UINIC and the UNESCO ASPnet brought the schools together. Some interesting issues the young people highlighed were how the thought music impacted on how women are seen by males, the problems associated with rigid male ideas of Caribbean masculinity and how it could be a factor in violence against women in the region. The Danes explained that human rights is part of their eduction and culture, that vilolence was not as extreme as it is in the Caribbean , but lamented that their country still does rank at the top in their region when it comes to gender based violence.

This activity was one of a number of events during the 16 Days of Activism which starts on 25 November and culminates on 10 December - Human Rights Day. During this period the UN and its partners highlight the global issues of gender equality and gender based violence.

Get Involved:

There is so much that you can do to ensure that everyone enjoys equal rights with dignity, everywhere. Some things you can do from your mobile phone or in your classroom. 

#Standup4HumanRights 

Promote | Engage | Reflect 

Join the UN in celebrating 70 year of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights:

70 Years UDHR LOGO E 01

UN Announces worldwide search for young leaders

The UN Youth Envoy has just announced the call for applications for the next class of Young Leaders for the Sustainable Development Goals!

The world is currently home to the largest generation of young people in history. With 50% of the world’s population being under the age of 30, the ideas and talents of young people will drive the success of achieving the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. 

That’s why the United Nations is on a mission to unearth 17 of world’s greatest young changemakers, innovators, and ground-breakers!

 Launching the Class of 2016 was a huge success-- after a year of advocacy, they’ve spoken on hundreds of platforms and reached millions of people spreading the message of the Goals. Selected from over 18,000 nominations, the first class of Young Leaders for the SDGs are 17 global citizens who come from many different backgrounds, represent every region in the world and are recognized for their outstanding leadership in their efforts to achieve the Goals.

Until November 3rd, we’re on a mission to unearth 17 of the world’s greatest young leaders working across all sectors and from every corner of the world to make up the next Class of Young Leaders for the SDGs.

[ read more ]

Youth around the world speak up for a world free of nuclear weapons

Around 100 young people from 54 countries are raising their voices and harnessing social media to help mobilize support for a world free of nuclear weapons, and advance the entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT).

Youth are among the 1,000 participants at this week’s Science and Technology 2017 Conference, held in Vienna, Austria, which provides a forum for scientists around the world to exchange knowledge and share advances in monitoring and verification technologies of relevance to the CTBT, which prohibits nuclear explosions anywhere in the world.
The young people listened to presentations from scientists around the world specializing in technologies for detecting nuclear events and committed to using social media and blogs to encourage others to push for the Treaty's entry into force.

For the CTBT, adopted by the General Assembly in September 1996, to enter into force, ratification is required from the so-called Annex II countries. Of these, China, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), Egypt, India, Iran, Israel, Pakistan, and the US have yet to ratify.

[ read the full story ]


 More stories:

    Caribbean region becomes free of highly enriched uranium

 October 2015 – The United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) today announced that Jamaica completed the conversion of its research reactor to low enriched uranium this month, decreasing proliferation risks and making the   Caribbean region completely free of highly enriched uranium. 

 

 

 

Youth around the world speak up for a world free of nuclear weapons

Around 100 young people from 54 countries are raising their voices and harnessing social media to help mobilize support for a world free of nuclear weapons, and advance the entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT).

Youth are among the 1,000 participants at this week’s Science and Technology 2017 Conference, held in Vienna, Austria, which provides a forum for scientists around the world to exchange knowledge and share advances in monitoring and verification technologies of relevance to the CTBT, which prohibits nuclear explosions anywhere in the world.
The young people listened to presentations from scientists around the world specializing in technologies for detecting nuclear events and committed to using social media and blogs to encourage others to push for the Treaty's entry into force.

For the CTBT, adopted by the General Assembly in September 1996, to enter into force, ratification is required from the so-called Annex II countries. Of these, China, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), Egypt, India, Iran, Israel, Pakistan, and the US have yet to ratify.

[ read the full story ]


 More stories:

    Caribbean region becomes free of highly enriched uranium

 October 2015 – The United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) today announced that Jamaica completed the conversion of its research reactor to low enriched uranium this month, decreasing proliferation risks and making the   Caribbean region completely free of highly enriched uranium. 

 

 

 

Better sexual reproductive health could save adolescent lives

From UNESCO - More than 3,000 adolescents die every day, totalling 1.2 million deaths a year, from largely preventable causes, according to a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO), UNESCO and partners.
In 2015, nearly two thirds of adolescents, approximately 85,000, died in low- and middle-income countries of the African and South-East Asia regions. With road traffic injuries, lower respiratory infections and suicide as the biggest causes of death among adolescents, unsafe sex and early and unintended pregnancy are also taking lives.

We can prevent a vast majority of adolescent deaths

Most of these deaths can be prevented with good quality health services, education and social support. However, in many cases, adolescents who suffer from mental health disorders, substance use or poor nutrition cannot obtain critical prevention and care services – either because the services do not exist, or because they do not know about them.

In addition, many behaviours that impact health later in life, such as physical inactivity, poor diet, and risky sexual health behaviours, begin in adolescence.

Data in the report, Global Accelerated Action for the Health of Adolescents (AA-HA!): Guidance to Support Country Implementation, reveal stark differences in causes of death when separating the adolescent group by age and by sex. The report also includes the range of interventions—from seat-belt laws to introducing comprehensive sexuality education to school curricula—that countries can take to improve their health and well-being and dramatically cut unnecessary deaths.
 

[ read the full story ]

Malala designated youngest-ever UN Messenger of Peace

10 April 2017 – United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres today designated children’s rights activist and Nobel Laureate Malala Yousafzai as a UN Messenger of Peace with a special focus on girls’ education.

“You have been to the most difficult places […] visited several refugee camps. Your foundation has schools in Lebanon, in the Beka’a Valley,” said Mr. Guterres at a ceremony in the Trusteeship Council chamber at UN Headquarters, in New York.

“[You are a] symbol of perhaps the most important thing in the world, education for all,” he highlighted.

Ms. Yousafzai, who was shot in 2012 by the Taliban for attending classes, is the youngest-ever UN Messenger of Peace and the first one to be designated by Secretary-General Guterres since he assumed office in January this year.

Accepting the accolade, Ms. Yousafzai underscored the importance of education, especially education of girls, for advancing communities and societies.

“[Bringing change] starts with us and it should start now,” she said, adding: “If you want to see your future bright, you have to start working now [and] not wait for anyone else.”

UN Messengers of Peace are distinguished individuals, carefully selected from the fields of art, literature, science, entertainment, sports or other fields of public life, who have agreed to help focus worldwide attention on the work of the global Organization.

Backed by the highest honour bestowed by the Secretary-General on a global citizen, these prominent personalities volunteer their time, talent and passion to raise awareness of UN’s efforts to improve the lives of billions of people everywhere.

 

If you speak out, you can help people – UN Messenger of Peace Malala Following the official presentation, Secretary-General Guterres and Ms. Yousafzai conversed with youth representatives from around the world on the theme of girls’ education. Taking a question from a 10 4 17malalayoung speaker in the audience, Ms. Yousafzai said the most difficult time she faced had been from 2007 to 2009 in the Swat Valley, “because we were at a point of making a decision about whether to speak out or remain silent. And I realized that if you remain silent, you are still going to be terrorized. So speaking out, you can help people.” While recovering from the Taliban attack, she realized that “extremists tried everything to stop me [and the fact that they didn’t] is clear evidence that no one can stop me. I have second life for the purpose of [pressing for] education and I’ll continue working on [this issue].

 

Ms. Yousafazi went on to say that brothers and fathers must also support women and girls in the global effort to ensure education for all and, more importantly, to “be who they want to be.” Indeed, she said that her father always told people not to ask him what he did for Malala, ‘but ask what I didn’t do – I didn’t clip her wings.’

 

Summing up the conversation, Mr. Guterrers called Ms. Yousafzai’s life “a remarkable example of solidarity.” Yet, he said, Pakistan is also such an example. “We live in a world where so many borders are closed; so many doors are closed, but Pakistan has received seven million refugees with open borders, open doors and hearts – a symbol of generosity.”

 

He hoped this spirit could serve as an example that “it is not by closing doors that we will all be able to move forward.”

Contact

Email: unic.portofspain@unic.org 

Telephone: 1(868) 623 8438 or 623 4813

Fax: 1 (868) 623 4332 

Address: 

2nd Floor Bretton Hall, 16 Victoria Avenue, 

Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago

 

 

 

Feature photos

  • sat18 04
  • RUBÉNUNCARES
  • UNESCO aspnetshot
  • aspnetyouth
  • Faces of Rotary (Central PoS) MUN 2017
  • UNIC UN Cares Trainer gets his certificate
  • UNESCO(National Commission) hosts ASPNET workshop at the UNIC
  • Students from the ASPnet programme connected who participated in gender based violence dialogue