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UN eyes transition of Haiti role from peacekeeping to development

“While achieving results should remain our common priority, we have already started to prepare for a transition to a non-peacekeeping presence, based on lessons learned in Haiti and in other contexts,”

the Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations, Jean-Pierre Lacroix, told the Security Council.

He said that in the coming months, his office will provide progress assessments to allow the 15-member body to take well-informed decisions for the drawdown and eventual withdrawal of the UN Mission for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH).

Established in October last year, MINUJUSTH replaced UN Stabilization Mission, which operated in the tiny island nation for 13 years.

Much smaller than its predecessor, which had more than 4,000 military and police personnel, MINUJUSTH assists Haiti to further develop national police, strengthen rule of law institutions and promote and protect human rights.

While the Security Council is expected to renew MINUJUSTH, whose initial mandate expires on 15 April 2018, Mr. Lacroix said the UN is determined to ensure it be the last peacekeeping operation deployed to Haiti.

Last month, UN released a strategic assessment of MINUJUSTH, including 11 benchmarks for a smooth transition to a non-peacekeeping presence by the last quarter of 2019.

“Haiti has come a long way to achieve the relative political and security stability it is now enjoying, but persistent economic uncertainties, which can result in social exclusion, particularly of youth and the most vulnerable, may undermine this progress,” said Mr. Lacroix.

In mid March, he visited Haiti for the first time since taking office a year ago.

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Deputy Secretary General : "UN will walk with Haiti"

United Nations Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed and UN Special Envoy for Haiti Josette Sheeran wrapped up a three-day visit to the island on Sunday, pledging more help to defeat cholera and assist the Government in achieving the broader aims of the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

The UN will walk this path with Haiti,” Ms. Mohammed said on Twitter, referring the work under way inside Haiti towards becoming an emergent country by 2030, the finish line agreed by all nations to achieve of the Agenda and its landmark 17 Goals, knows as the SDGs.

“We come to try to find another way to do things better; because in the past, we have fallen short. We were not able to do what we had planned,”

Amina Mohammed
UN Deputy Secretary General" icon="icon" avatar="

In an opinion piece late last week in the Miami Herald, the UN chief said the partnership would stretch across the UN's work on the island – including to continue addressing Haiti's cholera challenge and the “unacceptable incidents” of sexual exploitation and abuse by UN personnel – and aims to help Haiti move “from an emergency approach to durable solutions, from assistance to investment support, from handouts to hand-to-hand cooperation for sustainable development, to democracy and dignity for all Haitians.”

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Human Development Report - Extreme poverty and exclusion amidst progress in Latin America and Caribbean

 

Development gaps for women, indigenous peoples, remote dwellers and other groups set to widen unless deep-rooted development barriers, including violence, discrimination and unequal political participation, are tackled.

Stockholm, 21 March 2017 – A quarter-century of impressive human development gains in Latin America and the Caribbean masks slow and uneven progress for certain disadvantaged groups. A stronger focus on dismantling key barriers to development is urgently needed to ensure sustainable human development for all. These are some key findings of the Human Development Report 2016, entitled ‘Human Development for Everyone’, released today by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

The report finds that although average human development improved significantly across all regions from 1990 to 2015, one in three people worldwide continue to live in low levels of human development as measured by the Human Development Index (HDI). “The world has come a long way in rolling back extreme poverty, in improving access to education, health and sanitation, and in expanding possibilities for women and girls,” said UNDP Administrator Helen Clark, speaking at the launch of the report in Stockholm today. “But those gains are a prelude to the next, possibly tougher challenge, to ensure the benefits of global progress reach everyone.”

According to the report, the Latin America and Caribbean region enjoys high levels of human development among developing regions, second only to Europe and Central Asia. However, when adjusted for inequality, the region’s HDI drops by almost a quarter due to the unequal distribution of human development gains, particularly income.

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Human Development Report 2016 ‘Human Development for Everyone’ to Launch 21 March 2017

The Human Development Report 2016 ‘Human Development for Everyone’ will be launched on 21 March in Stockholm with the Prime Minister of Sweden, Stefan Löfven; United Nations Development Programme Administrator, Helen Clark; and the Director of the Human Development Report Office and lead author of the report, Selim Jahan. In past decades, there have been significant gains in human development levels in almost every country; but millions of people have not benefitted from this progress. Who has been left behind and why? The Human Development Report 2016 looks into these two questions. It identifies substantial barriers to development and recognizes that in every society certain groups are far more likely to suffer disadvantages than others. The report also looks to what societies should do to advance human development for everyone. It sets forward policy recommendations at the national level and also looks at ways in which the global development landscape – particularly multilateral organizations – could be made more effective in the fight to leave no one behind and achieve the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The report also looks to what societies should do to advance human development for everyone. It sets forward policy recommendations at the national level and also looks at ways in which the global development landscape – particularly multilateral organizations – could be made more effective in the fight to leave no one behind and achieve the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

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Day 3 ( CFF)

8:00am – Welcome and Opening Statement

9:00am – Session 5
Pillars for Sustainability

10:45am – Coffee Break

11:00am – Session 6A
Poverty and Inequality:
Could it End?

11:00am – Session 6B
Bold Action and Outcomes: Governance Challenges

1:00pm – Lunch

2:00pm – Session 7
Advocating Innovative Financing Solutions

3:45pm – Coffee Break

4:00pm – Session 8
Global Diplomacy in the Caribbean

6:00pm – Forum Closure

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