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UN: stark gap between urban and rural employment in Latin America and the Caribbean

20 October 2016 – A new United Nations labour report has revealed that more than half of the 52 million workers in rural areas of the Latin American and Caribbean region are in a state of vulnerable employment, characterized by lower wages, lower social protections and the prevalence to poverty.

The UN International Labour Organization’s (ILOWorking in the rural area in the XXI century report (in Spanish), released in Colombia today, highlights that though productivity has increased in the countryside, large differences remain between the employment situation for urban workers and their rural counterparts.

In simpler terms: around 56 per cent of workers are in vulnerable employment in rural areas as compared to 27 per cent in urban areas.

“The rural area today is not what it was 20 or 30 years ago. We see great transformations: urbanization, less young people and older adults, a reduction in agricultural employment and an increase in nonfarm occupations,” said the Regional Director of the ILO for Latin America and the Caribbean, Jose Manuel Salazar, in a news release announcing the report.

“Given that in the region the greater part of labour income comes from work, it is clear that the welfare and development of rural areas depend on what happens in the labour markets, income and employment conditions,” he added.

According to ILO, one of the reasons for the gaps between rural and urban areas is because the countryside receives a lower proportion of public and private investment which translates into productive and social infrastructures.

The report further notes that while unemployment in rural areas (3.1 per cent) is less than half of the in urban areas (6.9 per cent), it attributes this situation to the “need to work” in rural areas (due to high rates of poverty) and less access to education.

The study, which includes data by country, is based on statistical information available from household surveys in 14 countries also documents a series of improvements in working conditions in rural areas between 2005 and 2014.

One such area is health insurance coverage. However, still only 37 per cent of rural population have it in comparison with 62 per cent in urban areas. In addition, while there is a perceived increase in pension coverage, only 26 per cent of rural people are covered in comparison with 56 per cent from cities.

Similarly, in regard to labour income, the report notes that despite having grown faster than in the urban areas, average incomes in rural areas (as of 2014) were equivalent to 68 per cent of the average in urban areas.

Particularly startling is that the rate of rural poverty of 46.2 per cent, affecting 60 million rural people, is considerably higher than the rate of urban poverty calculated at 23.8 per cent.

Read more...

UN: stark gap between urban and rural employment in Latin America and the Caribbean

20 October 2016 – A new United Nations labour report has revealed that more than half of the 52 million workers in rural areas of the Latin American and Caribbean region are in a state of vulnerable employment, characterized by lower wages, lower social protections and the prevalence to poverty.

The UN International Labour Organization’s (ILOWorking in the rural area in the XXI century report (in Spanish), released in Colombia today, highlights that though productivity has increased in the countryside, large differences remain between the employment situation for urban workers and their rural counterparts.

In simpler terms: around 56 per cent of workers are in vulnerable employment in rural areas as compared to 27 per cent in urban areas.

“The rural area today is not what it was 20 or 30 years ago. We see great transformations: urbanization, less young people and older adults, a reduction in agricultural employment and an increase in nonfarm occupations,” said the Regional Director of the ILO for Latin America and the Caribbean, Jose Manuel Salazar, in a news release announcing the report.

“Given that in the region the greater part of labour income comes from work, it is clear that the welfare and development of rural areas depend on what happens in the labour markets, income and employment conditions,” he added.

According to ILO, one of the reasons for the gaps between rural and urban areas is because the countryside receives a lower proportion of public and private investment which translates into productive and social infrastructures.

The report further notes that while unemployment in rural areas (3.1 per cent) is less than half of the in urban areas (6.9 per cent), it attributes this situation to the “need to work” in rural areas (due to high rates of poverty) and less access to education.

The study, which includes data by country, is based on statistical information available from household surveys in 14 countries also documents a series of improvements in working conditions in rural areas between 2005 and 2014.

One such area is health insurance coverage. However, still only 37 per cent of rural population have it in comparison with 62 per cent in urban areas. In addition, while there is a perceived increase in pension coverage, only 26 per cent of rural people are covered in comparison with 56 per cent from cities.

Similarly, in regard to labour income, the report notes that despite having grown faster than in the urban areas, average incomes in rural areas (as of 2014) were equivalent to 68 per cent of the average in urban areas.

Particularly startling is that the rate of rural poverty of 46.2 per cent, affecting 60 million rural people, is considerably higher than the rate of urban poverty calculated at 23.8 per cent.

Read more...

Youth unemployment set to rise for the first time in 3 years

  • 25 August 2016 |
  • Published in Youth

24 August 2016 – With global youth unemployment expected to rise in 2016 for the first time in three years and the equally disturbing high levels of young people who work but still live in poverty, the United Nations labour agency today called for greater efforts to achieve sustainable economic growth and decent work.

Releasing its World Employment and Social Outlook 2016: Trends for Youth, the International Labour Organization (ILO) estimated that the global youth unemployment rate is expected to reach 13.1 per cent in 2016 and remain at that level through to 2017 (up from 12.9 per cent in 2015). As a result, the number of unemployed youth is set to rise by half a million this year to reach 71 million – the first such increase in three years.

Of greater concern, says ILO, is the share and number of young people, often in emerging and developing countries, who live in extreme or moderate poverty despite having a job. In fact, 156 million or 37.7 per cent of working youth are in extreme or moderate poverty (compared to 26 per cent of working adults).

“The alarming rise in youth unemployment and the equally disturbing high levels of young people who work but still live in poverty show how difficult it will be to reach the global goal to end poverty by 2030,” said Deborah Greenfield, ILO Deputy Director-General for Policy in a press release on report.

Calling for redoubled efforts to achieve sustainable economic growth and decent work, she also noted that the report highlights wide disparities between young women and men in the labour market that need to be addressed by ILO member States and the social partners urgently.

The ILO goes on to point out that Global economic growth in 2016 is estimated to stand at 3.2 per cent, 0.4 percentage points lower than the figure predicted in late 2015. “This is driven by a deeper than expected recession in some key emerging commodity-exporting countries and stagnating growth in some developed countries,” said ILO Senior Economist and lead author of the report Steven Tobin.

08 24 ILO youth unemployment
“The rise in youth unemployment rates is particularly marked in emerging countries” he adds as the report notes that in such countries, the rate is predicted to rise from 13.3 per cent in 2015 to 13.7 per cent in 2017 – a figure ILO says corresponds to 53.5 million unemployed in 2017 compared to 52.9 million in 2015.

In Latin America and the Caribbean, for example, the unemployment rate is expected to increase from 15.7 per cent in 2015 to 17.1 per cent in 2017; in Central and Western Asia, from 16.6 to 17.5 per cent; in South Eastern Asia and the Pacific, from 12.4 to 13.6 per cent.

The report also finds that globally, the share of young people between 15 and 29 years old who are willing to move permanently to another country stood at 20 per cent in 2015. The highest inclination to move abroad, at 38 per cent, is found in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean, followed closely by Eastern Europe at 37 per cent.

The working poor

The poor quality of employment continues to disproportionately affect youth, albeit with considerable regional differences. For example, sub- Saharan Africa continues to suffer the highest youth working poverty rates globally, at almost 70 per cent. Working poverty rates among young people are also elevated in Arab States (39 per cent) and Southern Asia (49 per cent).

At the same time, in developed economies, there is growing evidence of a shift in the age distribution of poverty, with youth taking the place of the elderly as the group at highest risk of poverty, defined for developed economies as earning less than 60 per cent of the median income.

For instance, in 2014, the share of young workers in the European Union-28 categorized as being at a high risk of poverty was 12.9 per cent compared to 9.6 per cent of prime-age workers (aged 25–54). The challenge is particularly acute in some countries where the at-risk-of-poverty for young workers exceeds 20 per cent.

Interactive map: In which countries is it hardest for young people to find work in 2016?

Read more...

Youth unemployment set to rise for the first time in 3 years

  • 25 August 2016 |
  • Published in Youth

24 August 2016 – With global youth unemployment expected to rise in 2016 for the first time in three years and the equally disturbing high levels of young people who work but still live in poverty, the United Nations labour agency today called for greater efforts to achieve sustainable economic growth and decent work.

Releasing its World Employment and Social Outlook 2016: Trends for Youth, the International Labour Organization (ILO) estimated that the global youth unemployment rate is expected to reach 13.1 per cent in 2016 and remain at that level through to 2017 (up from 12.9 per cent in 2015). As a result, the number of unemployed youth is set to rise by half a million this year to reach 71 million – the first such increase in three years.

Of greater concern, says ILO, is the share and number of young people, often in emerging and developing countries, who live in extreme or moderate poverty despite having a job. In fact, 156 million or 37.7 per cent of working youth are in extreme or moderate poverty (compared to 26 per cent of working adults).

“The alarming rise in youth unemployment and the equally disturbing high levels of young people who work but still live in poverty show how difficult it will be to reach the global goal to end poverty by 2030,” said Deborah Greenfield, ILO Deputy Director-General for Policy in a press release on report.

Calling for redoubled efforts to achieve sustainable economic growth and decent work, she also noted that the report highlights wide disparities between young women and men in the labour market that need to be addressed by ILO member States and the social partners urgently.

The ILO goes on to point out that Global economic growth in 2016 is estimated to stand at 3.2 per cent, 0.4 percentage points lower than the figure predicted in late 2015. “This is driven by a deeper than expected recession in some key emerging commodity-exporting countries and stagnating growth in some developed countries,” said ILO Senior Economist and lead author of the report Steven Tobin.

08 24 ILO youth unemployment
“The rise in youth unemployment rates is particularly marked in emerging countries” he adds as the report notes that in such countries, the rate is predicted to rise from 13.3 per cent in 2015 to 13.7 per cent in 2017 – a figure ILO says corresponds to 53.5 million unemployed in 2017 compared to 52.9 million in 2015.

In Latin America and the Caribbean, for example, the unemployment rate is expected to increase from 15.7 per cent in 2015 to 17.1 per cent in 2017; in Central and Western Asia, from 16.6 to 17.5 per cent; in South Eastern Asia and the Pacific, from 12.4 to 13.6 per cent.

The report also finds that globally, the share of young people between 15 and 29 years old who are willing to move permanently to another country stood at 20 per cent in 2015. The highest inclination to move abroad, at 38 per cent, is found in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean, followed closely by Eastern Europe at 37 per cent.

The working poor

The poor quality of employment continues to disproportionately affect youth, albeit with considerable regional differences. For example, sub- Saharan Africa continues to suffer the highest youth working poverty rates globally, at almost 70 per cent. Working poverty rates among young people are also elevated in Arab States (39 per cent) and Southern Asia (49 per cent).

At the same time, in developed economies, there is growing evidence of a shift in the age distribution of poverty, with youth taking the place of the elderly as the group at highest risk of poverty, defined for developed economies as earning less than 60 per cent of the median income.

For instance, in 2014, the share of young workers in the European Union-28 categorized as being at a high risk of poverty was 12.9 per cent compared to 9.6 per cent of prime-age workers (aged 25–54). The challenge is particularly acute in some countries where the at-risk-of-poverty for young workers exceeds 20 per cent.

Interactive map: In which countries is it hardest for young people to find work in 2016?

Read more...

Jobs in the Caribbean

Vacant positions inthe Caribbean are usually advertised in the major newspapers and also on the websites of the respective United Nations offices.

Current Vacancies: 

 * UNIC is not responisble for processing applications for the positions listed below. Each announcement will give instructions on what steps to take. You should also contact the country office for more information.


Trinidad and Tobago ( No vacancies posted at this time)


Barbados ( No vacancies posted at this time)


1487042832 label new yellow

Jamaica:

 

Job Description Deadline date  

SENIOR PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT OFFICER, P5

Posted by:

UNITED NATIONS ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMME

* For this post, fluency in written and oral English is required. Working knowledge of Spanish is desirable.

07 March 2017  

Guyana ( no vacancies posted at this time)


Surriname ( No vacancies posted at this time


Consider employment in other countries:

There are opportunities for you to join United Nations teams in other Duty Stations around the world.

Because most of the jobs theUnited Nations offers are in the field or at it head offices , you should also look outside of the Caribbean for vacancies if you are keen on becoming an international civil servant.

 

 

 

 

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Start a career with the United Nations

What it means to work for the UN

The world looks to the United Nations for solutions to complex problems everywhere; from ending conflict and alleviating poverty, to combating climate change and defending human rights. The issues on our agenda are manifold and diverse as are the careers we offer. Among our ranks you will find staff members who monitor elections, disarm child soldiers, coordinate relief in humanitarian crises and provide administrative as well as logistical support to carry out our complex mandates. These are just a few examples amongst our many other equally critical and necessary functions.

As an international civil servant, you are expected to uphold the highest standards of efficiency, competence and integrity in all matters affecting your work and status. Integrity includes probity, impartiality, fairness, honesty and truthfulness. Those we serve have a right to expect no less.  [ learn more ]

 

What are my career options?

There are a number of ways that you can join the
United Nations' teams across the globe. Some options are to work for a short time, volunteer your services or  become a long term staff member.

Staff categories:

  • Professional and higher categories - Work in the Professional category generally demands a high degree of analytical and communication skills, substantive expertise and/or managerial leadership ability. Typically, these positions require judgment in analyzing and evaluating problems as well as in decision-making involving discretionary choices between alternative courses of action. They also require the understanding of an organized body of theoretical knowledge at a level equivalent to that represented by a university degree. While this knowledge is customarily and characteristically acquired through formal education, it may, in some fields of learning or specialized disciplines, be acquired through other training, self-study, or practical experience.
  • General Service and related categories - The work carried out by General Service staff supports the functioning of the Organization and is typically procedural, operational or technical in nature. The work in these categories ranges from routine duties to varied and complex assignments. The knowledge of the subject matter and higher-level skills are generally developed through long experience and familiarity with applicable procedures, regulations and precedents or projects of the Organization in a narrow technical field or in an administrative support activity. The higher the level of the job, the more complex the functions become along with higher levels of responsibility.

    Staff in the General Service and related categories are generally recruited locally from the area in which the particular office is located but could be of any nationality. As a result, such staff members are usually not expected to move between different duty stations.

  • National Professional Officers   - National Professional Officers are normally locally recruited and perform functions at the professional level. The qualifications for National Professional Officers are the same as for the Professional category and require as a minimum a first-level university degree. Jobs for National Professional Officers can only be found in non-headquarters duty stations.

    National Professional Officers are nationals of the country in which they are serving and their functions must have a national context, i.e. functions that require national experience or knowledge of the national language, culture, institutions, and systems. Examples of these positions include human rights officers, political affairs officers, legal officers, medical officers, child protection officers, humanitarian affairs officers, interpreters and civil engineers.

  • Field Service  - Staff in the Field Service category are normally recruited internationally to serve in field missions. You are expected to be highly mobile and to serve in different locations during your career. They provide administrative, technical, logistics and other support services to United Nations field missions. You are required to have as a minimum a High School diploma or equivalent; some positions may require a technical or vocational certificate.

  • Senior Appointments -As is the practice in many other international institutions, one arrives at the highest positions in the Secretariat either by appointment of the Organization's legislative organs or Chief Administrative Officer. These positions include: Secretary-General, Deputy Secretary-General, Under Secretary-General, Assistant Secretary-General.

 


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Contact

Email: unic.portofspain@unic.org 

Telephone: 1(868) 623 8438 or 623 4813

Fax: 1 (868) 623 4332 

Address: 

2nd Floor Bretton Hall, 16 Victoria Avenue, 

Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago

 

 

 

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