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Displaying items by tag: Gender based violence

UN Special Rapporteur calls for fresh steps to tackle violence against women in the Bahamas

GENEVA (20 December 2017) – The Bahamas should enshrine the principle of gender equality in its constitution as part of a series of measures to clamp down on discrimination and violence against women, a UN human rights expert has urged after an official mission to the country.

Sex-based discrimination against women is not prohibited in all fields and the principle of equality between women and men is not enshrined in the legislation, which, in turn, results in a weak legal framework for the protection of women and girls against gender-based violence, noted Dubravka Šimonović, the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences, after her visit from 11-15 December 2017.

She urged the Government to adopt a comprehensive law on violence against women and domestic violence and to close other legal gaps, for example by outlawing marital rape and by tackling a discrepancy between the age of sexual consent and the age at which women can receive contraceptive and other health services without parental consent.

She said that there was no recognition of linkage between violence against women and the broader context of sex-based discrimination against women.“Violence against women is deeply rooted in persisting gender stereotypes and patriarchy, and sex-based discrimination against women,” the Special Rapporteur said in a statement at the end of her mission.

 

“In my view, violence against women is hidden, denied and, even more worryingly, accepted as normal.”

Dubravka Šimonović
UN Special Rapporteur for Ending Violence against women

“The Bahamas has come a long way, but there is still a long way to go to eliminate violence against women and girls, its causes and consequences, that are entrenched in a broader framework of different forms of discrimination against women.”More education on gender equality and gender-based violence, awareness, the setting up of an observatory on data collection, and analysis were needed to help fully reveal the extent of violence against women and tackle gender-based violence, along with more shelters, especially in the Family Islands, a 24/7 hotlines and free legal aid for victims, the expert said.

[ read the full story at OHCHR ]

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'Long walk to freedom' unfinished for women, girls – Deputy Secretary-General says in Mandela lecture

UN News Service, 25 November 2017 – Reflecting on the legacy of Nelson Mandela, United Nations Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed called for investment in women and girls, decrying gender inequality as perhaps the most pervasive disparity around the world.

“Sadly, the long walk to freedom for women and adolescent girls globally remains unfinished,” Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed told the 15th Nelson Mandela annual lecture in Cape Town, South Africa, referring to the title of Mr. Mandela's autobiography.Speaking on 25 November, which is marked annually as the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against women, the Deputy Secretary-General issued a call to action for the international community “to invest in the missing 50 per cent of our human asset base, the potential of our women and unleash their power for good.”

“Sadly, the long walk to freedom for women and adolescent girls globally remains unfinished,”  .. UN Deputy Secretary-General

“Just as the world came together to support the end of subjugation on the basis of race in this great country, we need today to birth a new movement that calls for true equality, everywhere,” she urged.Ms. Mohammed noted that violence against women in homes and war zones is “a global pandemic”. Additionally, fewer than one-third of senior management positions in the private sector are held by women, and less than 25 per cent of all parliamentarians are women.She said the new narrative must address the current context and constituency of young people left behind.

[ read the full story at UN News Centre


"What is 16 Days of Activism?" 

OrangeWorldLogo2017 Square Print

From 25 November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, to 10 December, Human Rights Day, the 16 Days of 

Activism against Gender-Based Violence Campaign is a time to galvanize action to end violence against women and girls around the world. The international campaign originated from the first Women's Global Leadership Institute coordinated by the Center for Women's Global Leadership in 1991.

This year, the UNiTE Campaign will mark the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence under the overarching theme, “Leave No One Behind: End Violence against Women and Girls”— reflecting the core principle of the transformative 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

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International Day to End Violence Against Women and Girls

UN Secretary-General's Message for the International Day

to End Violence against Women and Girls

25 November 2016

 

At long last, there is growing global recognition that violence against women and girls is a human rights violation, public health pandemic and serious obstacle to sustainable development.  Yet there is still much more we can and must do to turn this awareness into meaningful prevention and response.

 Violence against women and girls imposes large-scale costs on families, communities and economies.  When women cannot work as a result of violence, their employment may be put at risk, jeopardizing much-needed income, autonomy and their ability to leave abusive relationships.  Violence against women also results in lost productivity for businesses, and drains resources from social services, the justice system and health-care agencies. Domestic and intimate partner violence remains widespread, compounded by impunity for those crimes.  The net result is enormous suffering as well as the exclusion of women from playing their full and rightful roles in society.

 The world cannot afford to pay this price. Women and girls cannot afford it – and should not have to.  Yet such violence persists every day, around the world.  And efforts to address this challenge, although rich in political commitment, are chronically under-funded.

 Since 2008, I have led the UNiTE campaign to End Violence against Women, which calls for global action to increase resources and promote solutions.  I call on governments to show their commitment by dramatically increasing national spending in all relevant areas, including in support of women’s movements and civil society organizations.  I also encourage world leaders to contribute to UN Women and to the United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence against Women.  We look as well to the private sector, philanthropies and concerned citizens to do their part.

 Today, we are seeing the world lit up in orange, symbolizing a bright future for women and girls. With dedicated investment, we can keep these lights shining, uphold human rights and eliminate violence against women and girls for good.

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Remarks at event marking the International Day to End Violence against Women and Girls:

The Secretary-General

Remarks at event marking the International Day to End Violence against Women and Girls:

“Orange the World: Raise Money to End Violence Against Women”
New York, 21 November 2016

 


It is a great pleasure to join you today.

Since this will be my last observance of this Day, Orange Day, as Secretary-General, I want to thank all of you for a decade of remarkable global activism towards ending violence against women and girls. I will try to participate in Korea and I will be with you in spirit, in the future. 

You have defended the vulnerable and fought impunity.  The United Nations and I, personally, have stood with you.  

This is truly a matter of life and death.  In some countries, as many as 70 per cent of women report having experienced physical or sexual violence from an intimate partner.  In some countries, intimate partner violence accounts for between 40 and 70 per cent of female murder victims.

The statistics almost defy belief.  What is even harder to understand is why: Why, why men prey on women and girls. Why societies shame the victims.  Why governments fail to punish deadly crimes.  Why the world denies itself the fruits of women’s full participation.

The world cannot afford to pay this price. Women and girls cannot afford it – and should not have to.   

I have tried to put the full UN machinery behind our efforts to rid the world of violence against women and girls, including through UN Women, the Unite campaign, the Network of Men Leaders, and my own constant advocacy.

At long last, we are seeing a growing global recognition that violence against women and girls is a human rights violation, public health pandemic and serious obstacle to sustainable development. 

Yet there is still much more we can and must do to turn this awareness into meaningful prevention and action.

These efforts are chronically under-funded.  I call on governments to show their commitment by dramatically increasing national spending in all relevant areas, including in support of women’s movements and civil society organizations.  I also encourage world leaders to contribute to UN Women and to the United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence against Women.  We look as well to the private sector, philanthropies and concerned citizens to do their part. 

I have seen much horror during the past ten years.  But I have also seen great heroism and resilience -- by women risking their lives in the fight for human rights, and by girls reclaiming their lives following unspeakable attacks.

Some of the most impactful and inspiring moments of my entire term as Secretary-General occurred in the context of our struggle for women’s empowerment.  I will never forget my conversations with girls and women at the HEAL Africa hospital in Goma, DRC.  And I will always remember my meetings with one of the world’s great advocates, Malala Yusafzai. 

I thank everyone who has joined to support this vital cause, including you here in this room.  

Today, we are seeing the world lit up in orange, symbolizing a bright future for women and girls. With investments and political will, we can keep these lights shining for good.

Thank you very much.

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